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Allergic Bronchitis and Allergic Bronchitis and Treatments

Allergic Bronchitis and Allergic Bronchitis and Treatments
by loverboy » Sat Oct 01, 2016 3:19 pm

Allergic Bronchitis - Allergic Bronchitis - Treatments that One Should Know

Allergic bronchitis is a type of asthma, which causes the obstruction of the airways when the bronchi or the air passages of the lungs become filled up with mucous during an asthma attack. Respiratory illnesses have significant effects on the lives of millions of people. It can be acute, when it is a short term illness and easily treatable. In allergic bronchitis, both asthma symptoms and allergies are present which can cause hay fever and allergic rhinitis. By far, the majority of cases of bronchitis stem from viral infections.

There are some cases that a person can be so sensitive to allergens that blocked airways caused by severe swelling of the tissue in the airway can cause hospitalization or death and this is considered as a dangerous situation that needs immediate medical assistance. But fortunately in most cases allergic bronchitis is considered as a mild to moderate condition. Awareness of this particular condition is important. :roll:

Symptoms of it may include runny nose, shortness of breath, red or swollen eyes, rashes, hyperventilation, tickling in throat, constant sneezing, tight chest, headache, nausea, coughing, and other allergy symptoms. This type of bronchitis is often worse at night. Chronic bronchitis is characterized by a persistent dry cough without other symptoms. :)

Allergic bronchitis is manageable, however if you have this illness you must also be aware that it can be dangerous at times. It is important that you know how to deal with it whenever you are exposed to unexpected allergen, like taking medications with you at all times in case of emergency. It is only because that we are rather fluent on the subject viral bronchitis airways symptoms we have ventured on writing something so influential on Bronchitis Treatment like this! :idea:

Treatment of mild to moderate types includes, taking anti-histamine medications and avoiding allergens that can stimulate the allergy. It may also be treated with antihistamine medications to reduce the allergic reaction. Consulting your doctor is also important. They usually conduct an examination or skin test where in allergens are inserted beneath the skin that will identify specific allergens that cause allergic bronchitis. Your doctor may also recommend you to an allergist, who specializes in this condition and can give you more advice in preventing the occurrence of it. This can be cured after 25-35 days of treatment. :roll:

Allergic asthma also known as allergic bronchitis is different from non-allergic bronchitis, which is often linked to a severe cold or flu. This condition is triggered when the overly active immune system identifies harmless substances as dangerous and then releases antibodies to attack them as they enter the body. Most allergic bronchitis is mainly caused by an exposure to allergens, while there are conditions that can be considered as a non-allergic bronchitis which is caused by a virus or bacteria. Although there was a lot of fluctuation in the writing styles of we independent writers, we have come up with an end product on Bronchitis Often worth reading!

Diagnosing chronic bronchitis can be very difficult, because chronic bronchitis shares several symptoms with other diseases including pneumonia and emphysema. During the examination the doctor will ask you for a full medical history, and then run a full physical check up. Your doctor will ask you about any symptoms you are experiencing, and probably inquire about your smoking habits, because smoking cigarettes is the number one cause of chronic bronchitis. If the results are inconclusive, there are several different tests that may be done to see if you are suffering from chronic bronchitis: :lol:

Pulmonary Function Testing (PFT)

This test involves a series of breathing exercises into a machine. This machines measures the airflow, and amount of oxygen that is able to flow into your lungs. This is important in testing for chronic bronchitis because many individuals who suffer from chronic bronchitis experience a shortness of breath, and labored breathing. This test allows your doctor to assess how well your lungs are functioning. When doing an assignment on Chronic Bronchitis, it is always better to look up and use matter like the one given here. Your assignment turns out to be more interesting and colorful this way.

X-Ray - An x-ray of the chest can provide the doctor with a confirmed diagnosis of chronic bronchitis, and allows for ruling out of other lung diseases. Learning about things is what we are living here for now. So try to get to know as much about everything, including Chronic Bronchitis whenever possible.

Allergic Bronchitis- Causes, Symptoms and Cure | Healthy Lifestyles

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High Resolution Computer Tomography

HRCT is a special type of CT scan that is able to provide the doctor with clear imaging of your lungs. An HRCT is performed exactly as a CT scan is, and should only take a few minutes. HRCT's are usually performed on an open air table. People always think that they know everything about everything; however, it should be known that no one is perfect in everything. There is never a limit to learning; even learning about Bronchitis Often.

Testing for Chronic Bronchitis is Generally Painless and Easy

If you feel you may be suffering from chronic bronchitis it is a good idea to schedule an appointment with your doctor and make sure. Avoid smoking and breathing in irritants either in the workplace or in the home. If you are diagnosed with chronic bronchitis it is often a smart idea to change your diet, and begin exercising daily to avoid feeling the symptoms of chronic bronchitis.

The fluoroquinolones are a relatively new group of antibiotics. Fluoroquinolones were first introduced in 1986, but they are really modified quinolones, a class of antibiotics, whose accidental discovery occurred in the early 1960.

First Generation

The first-generation agents include cinoxacin and nalidixic acid, which are the oldest and least often used quinolones. These drugs had poor systemic distribution and limited activity and were used primarily for gram-negative urinary tract infections. Cinoxacin and nalidixic acid require more frequent dosing than the newer quinolones, and they are more susceptible to the development of bacterial resistance.

Because of concern about hepatotoxicity, trovafloxacin therapy should be reserved for life- or limb-threatening infections requiring inpatient treatment (hospital or long-term care facility), and the drug should be taken for no longer than 14 days. Writing is something that has to be done when one is in the mood to write. So when we got in the mood to write about Bronchitis, nothing could stop us from writing!

Because of their expanded antimicrobial spectrum, third-generation fluoroquinolones are useful in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia, acute sinusitis and acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, which are their primary FDA-labeled indications. The third-generation fluoroquinolones include levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin and sparfloxacin. Ignorance is bliss, is it? Isn't it better to learn more than not to know about something like Chronic Bronchitis. So we have produced this article so that you can learn more about it!

Fourth Generation

The fourth-generation fluoroquinolones add significant antimicrobial activity against anaerobes while maintaining the gram-positive and gram-negative activity of the third-generation drugs. They also retain activity against Pseudomonas species comparable to that of ciprofloxacin. The fourth-generation fluoroquinolones include trovafloxacin (Trovan). It is rather inviting to go on writing on Bronchitis. however as there is a limitation to the number of words to be written, we have confined ourselves to this. However, do enjoy yourself reading it.

Fluoroquinolones are approved for use only in people older than 18. They can affect the growth of bones, teeth, and cartilage in a child or fetus. The FDA has assigned fluoroquinolones to pregnancy risk category C, indicating that these drugs have the potential to cause teratogenic or embryocidal effects. Giving fluoroquinolones during pregnancy is not recommended unless the benefits justify the potential risks to the fetus. These agents are also excreted in breast milk and should be avoided during breast-feeding if at all possible. A rolling stone gathers no moss. So if I just go on writing, and you don't understand, then it is of no use of me writing about Chronic Bronchitis! Whatever written should be understandable by the reader. ;)

Fluoroquinolones Disadvantages:

Tendonitis or tendon rupture Multiple drug interactions Not used in children Newer quinolones produce additional toxicities to the heart that were not found with the older agents It is with much interest that we got about to write on Bronchitis. So we do hope that you too read this article with the same, if not more interest!

The newer fluoroquinolones have a wider clinical use and a broader spectrum of antibacterial activity including gram-positive and gram-negative aerobic and anaerobic organisms. Some of the newer fluoroquinolones have an important role in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and intra-abdominal infections.

Classification of Fluoroquinolones

As a group, the fluoroquinolones have excellent in vitro activity against a wide range of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The newest fluoroquinolones have enhanced activity against gram-positive bacteria with only a minimal decrease in activity against gram-negative bacteria. Their expanded gram-positive activity is especially important because it includes significant activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae.

Urinary tract infections (norfloxacin, lomefloxacin, enoxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, trovafloxacin) Lower respiratory tract infections (lomefloxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, trovafloxacin) Skin and skin-structure infections (ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, trovafloxacin) Urethral and cervical gonococcal infections (norfloxacin, enoxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin, trovafloxacin) Prostatitis (norfloxacin, ofloxacin, trovafloxacin) Acute sinusitis (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin (Avelox), trovafloxacin) Acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (levofloxacin, sparfloxacin (Zagam), gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, trovafloxacin) Community-acquired pneumonia (levofloxacin, sparfloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin, trovafloxacin)

All of the fluoroquinolones are effective in treating urinary tract infections caused by susceptible organisms. They are the first-line treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis in patients who cannot tolerate sulfonamides or TMP, who live in geographic areas with known resistance > 10% to 20% to TMP-SMX, or who have risk factors for such resistance. Isn't it amazing how much information can be transferred through a single page? So much stands to gain, and to lose about Bronchitis through a single page.

The fluoroquinolones are a family of synthetic, broad-spectrum antibacterial agents with bactericidal activity. The parent of the group is nalidixic acid, discovered in 1962 by Lescher and colleagues. The first fluoroquinolones were widely used because they were the only orally administered agents available for the treatment of serious infections caused by gram-negative organisms, including Pseudomonas species.

Side Effects

The fluoroquinolones as a class are generally well tolerated. Most adverse effects are mild in severity, self-limited, and rarely result in treatment discontinuation. However, they can have serious adverse effects.

Conditions Treated With Fluoroquinolones: Indications and Uses

The newer fluoroquinolones have a wider clinical use and a broader spectrum of antibacterial activity including gram-positive and gram-negative aerobic and anaerobic organisms. Some of the newer fluoroquinolones have an important role in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and intra-abdominal infections. The serum elimination half-life of the fluoroquinolones range from 3 -20 hours, allowing for once or twice daily dosing.